In West Virginia, victims of car accidents can file a claim against the other driver as long as they themselves were deemed less than 50% at fault. It often turns out, especially in wintertime, that both drivers in a crash are responsible to some degree. Knowing how to drive safely in winter can help prevent accidents as well as any confusion as to who was at fault when accidents do arise.

Tips for short winter drives

Every driver should know that the rule of thumb is to stay home in bad winter weather unless they absolutely must go out. If they must, then they should slow down, even if that means going far below the posted speed limit, and increase their distance from the vehicle in front. This is called the following distance, and it should ideally be five or six seconds in winter. The reason is that cars take longer to brake on icy, snowy roads.

Accelerating and braking must be slow. On the other hand, drivers will want to keep as much momentum as possible, particularly when climbing up hills. It’s much harder to accelerate after a complete stop because the tires may spin in such cases.

Blankets and an emergency kit

Though drivers may not take a long trip anytime soon, it’s still wise to have a kit in the car with blankets and extra clothes, food, a flashlight and so on. They should avoid letting their fuel level dip below half a tank and maintain good tire pressure.

A lawyer for your injury case

The injuries that victims of motor vehicle accidents incur can be serious. Perhaps you’re no longer able to work because of them. You may also have little time to handle all the details of a claim. A lawyer may be helpful throughout the process, especially at the negotiation stage.